House Update: Roof, Rotten Gutters, Sill, and Back Door

So what is up with house renovation you’re all asking? I’ve been intentionally avoiding talking about it the last few weeks. Everything is up in the air. We are still trying to find someone to help us with the roof which at this point I wonder if we’ll get it done before winter? I’ll share more on the roof later. I thought I would round-up all the projects we have going on so you could get a better idea how it all connects.

Are you getting three tab or architectural shingles? The historic society approved architectural shingles which I prefer. Again, asphalt shingles are not historically accurate but a comprise. I am looking at darker gray shingles that will hopefully complement the house colors I’ve been brainstorming.

What have you learned about chimney liners? Chimneys are still up in the air. I stopped pursing estimates because it was looking like I can’t afford a roof and chimney liners this fall. Still looking for solutions other then thermocrete. I was told my chimney was too large to have metal liners which some of my readers have suggested seemed bogus.

What kind of gutters did you choose? Last night, the historical society meeting approved wood gutters and painted galvanized steel downspouts. We were hoping to get these replaced when our roof got done.

Are you planning to fix the rotten wall this fall? We haven’t talked a lot about this rotten wall on the blog. Basically we have major rot on a wall between our house and the neighbors. The sill and wall are rot and need to be replaced. Greg and I are trying to tackle this project ourselves. More to share in another post.

Are you going to replace your back door? I need to find a new (old) door to replace our current back door. The door itself is rot and not historically accurate. I need to research styles from the 1750’s and search for something comparable. I’m thinking I might contact Old House Parts in Kennebunk, Maine for some help.

Below photos of the house I took in the last few days. Our roof and gutters as is—gastly sight! Below Greg working on replacing the sill and the back door that needs to be replaced. Whef! Typing this all out kinda gave me a mini-anxiety attack. The renovation is feeling very overwhelming at the moment…




Related Posts:
Found! Secret Door
Learning More About Chimneys
3-Tab or Architectural Asphalt Shingles?
Brick Chimney Build


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17 Comments

  1. I have an awesome local carpenter who does roofs. He has helped us enormously with our 200 year-old place on Front Street. He is about to repair our roof and he is really knowledgeable about antique houses. Please feel free to email me or call me in town at 1-7899 if you want his info.

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  2. I was one of the summer casualties of “technical difficulties” I think, b/c I could not get e-mails from you. And now, you’re back! Yay!

    I don’t know where else to post this request; hope this is okay – would it be possible to show us what your garden looked like this summer? It looked very promising when you put it in last Spring! Thanks –

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  3. Oh, I do indeed know your pain, and I am so sorry, but it does get better, I promise. Hold dear to how wonderful everything is that you have done to save this house and ride it out… this too shall pass!
    Ask for Mike at OldHouseParts- he’s great. Also, you might want to check out Nor’East Architectural Antiques in South Hampton, NH- which would be a little closer to you than Kennebunk. They, too, have a really good selection.
    Sending a sympathetic hug!
    joan

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  4. Do you feel a least a little better getting it all down on ‘paper’?

    If you ever need a carpenter to help, we have a contractor friend who would be happy to assist you & Greg with one-off jobs. He’s at the tail end of renovating his own historic treasure in Salem, so he’d be very sympathetic!

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  5. Everytime I look at our old house to do list I can’t help but think that I should start playing the lottery. It’s exhausting just planning the work!

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  6. It’s easier said than done, but try not to stress. If the house has stood through neglect this long, then it can wait a little longer for you to finish everything. My husband and I passed on our chimney for now and spent the money in other areas as well.

    If you can find your new back door in a thickness that matches your old door it will be easier for the slab door install. Width and height aren’t that big a deal. You can always cut the door down to size if it’s too big. You probably already know this though!

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  7. Hang in there Katy- the house has waited a long time for you and Greg to come along and make it better, it won’t give up on you now!

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  8. I love your blog. My husband and I spent 5 years redoing a lovely old home in Kentucky. Your comments and pictures are bringing back so many good and not so good memories!! I miss that old house, but not all the stress and work. It turned out beautifully though.

    I’m adding you to my blog list if that’s ok? I’m excited to watch your progress!

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  9. oh my word, it sounds like you’ve got a lot on your plate. don’t you hate how winter sneaks up and ruins all good plans for projects? my biggest problems are with the lack of light and motivation. those always seem to slow me down!

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  10. I just took off my gutters as part of my exterior renovation and all the fascia is rotten underneath so I can relate to the stomach ache. I would guess your door should be a six-panel but you certainly have a lot of good references in Marblehead you can refer to. And I’m sure Old House Parts will have the perfect one.

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  11. It is overwhelming. There’s got to be a carpenter out there who can help Greg with the rotted sill. He can’t lift the house himself!
    It almost looks easier to rip it out and rebuild that back addition from scratch. What did the architect say?

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  12. Old House Parts is a *fabulous* resource. If you haven’t been already, I highly suggest taking a ride up there – it’s pretty amazing. They have tons of doors! Though even if you don’t, they would still be willing to help you via phone and e-mail, I’m sure…

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  13. I can imagine it makes you want to bury your head…but sincerely, imagine the day when the big stuff is done…and you’ll get to enjoy a beautiful house! (i know, i know…so much easier said than done….especially when i’m not doing it…) I admire what your doing though and totally believe one day it will pay off big time by just how much love you’ll have in that house!

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