Custom Indoor Shutters

I’ve been trying to come up with a solution for the windows in my den. Do I put up curtains, shutters, or just leave them bare? Last week I came across The Shutter Store; a custom online shutter company.

I spot shutters all over Marblehead. Most of the houses in the old town neighborhood are at street level. You can see right inside—so sweet and small town. Instead of covering all the windows with drapes I noticed most of the house just put shutters on the bottom. You can still see in but you have to really tall or get up on your tippy toes—which is just creepy. The older homes look like they have originally solid paneled shutters. I’ve searched for months for similar styles and turned up empty.

I spotted solid paneled versions on The Shutter Store’s site. I wonder if they could make a version for me to cover half my window? More like a cafe style? I’ll have to investigate. Above and below a few photos from their site. Shutters are so cute for traditional or more modern homes. Find out more: theshutterstore.com.



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26 Comments

  1. Hi Katy,
    Saw this posting, and have been trying to find a great source for you since I deal with shutters all the time. First, shutters are wonderful. Second, the flat, raised panel (as opposed to slatted) shutters were very common in out older New England homes. We’ve got them in our Boston townhome, and they are original from the 1820s.

    I found a place that makes the flat panel variety: shutterblinds.com. They seem to carry a brand called Americana. I’ve not done business with them before, so can’t comment, but the link below is direct to the flat panel style shutters. They’re authentic and great for privacy.

    http://www.shutterblinds.com/j2raised_panel.html

    I’ve seen people put the flat panel on the botom window, with softer romans above – very pretty for 1st floor living spaces.

    Sarah
    Topiary Interiors, Boston

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  2. Check out shuttercraft.com in Madison, CT. They made custom interior shutters for my powder room window. Great quality.

    Deb

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  3. if you don’t have privacy issues, go for bare windows in your upstairs den. the trim are so beautiful, shutters or curtains will cover them. take the time to live in the room and choose the right option.
    I like shutters, but I think they are more appropriate in the very hot and bright places in this world.

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  4. I just found your site but am feeling compelled to comment because I just ordered interiors shutters on line for a client and they were a disaster. Cheap looking and they just didn’t fit right no matter the adjustments we made. Sent them back but had to argue and argue and argue. Have them custom made. And I love your cafe style idea! I was contemplating that for my own living room but I can just never find the time. Interested to see what you do! Marija

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  5. I say go with the raised panel. Donna is right. Find a local carpenter. Old house are quirky, windows are not at right angles. You will have a better fit for a price point that is not too different than a shutter company.

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  6. My 2 Cents.. I’ve been looking at your pictures and think in the dead of winter those shutters are going to seem awfully cold and if it is the front of your house you will light up the street, One thought: wrought iron rods that swing away from the windows with, for winter anyway, heavy velvet curtains and change them in the summer for light airy white maybe scalloped edged white curtains or the same colour as the trim. I saw the wrought iron swing curtains on an Agatha Christy Miss Marple I think, they have the best set designers!! Easy in Marble head to find a Blacksmith or around Boston I would think and not expensive

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  7. In stead of the shutter store making them for you get your local carpenter or wood work shop to make them, then you can choose the wood or have them made of reclaimed wood for an older more textured feel…. Bespoke

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  8. I love our half plantation shutters – we have 5 over 1 windows and did not want to block the top. It’s one of my favorite improvements in our house.

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  9. I haven’t made any decisions on what to do with the windows. On the first floor I have a room that’s exactly the same. So ideas that don’t work in the den will probably work in the living room (downstairs).

    The living room is at street level and passer bys can see right in. Maybe shutters downstairs?

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  10. I really like the lace curtain/sheers idea from the previous post. I liked *everything* proposed in that post, those were great ideas.

    There’s a lot of wood already in the room, and the lace/sheer would be a nice contrast and let a lot of light in (even more necessary if you’re going with green and green and no white on the walls or trim).

    Having said that, full interior shutters do a lot more than a piece of sheer fabric at shutting out some of the cold in our charming new england winters (especially in a home from the era before insulation). But the half ones don’t do much on that front, and make the room a lot darker, even with the slats.

    I had looked into getting interior shutters made for my ginormous Victorian windows and it was prohibitively expensive, but for a couple of smaller windows, I don’t think the cost would be too high. ‘Though it would be higher than a couple of lace panels (very nice ones can be found at thrift shops).

    For me, window treatments are a final decision. I usually do everything else in the room first and then figure out what window stuff would make more sense and/or look better.

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  11. Leave the windows bare! I think you need the light.
    At the very least, decorate the entire room before
    you decide on shutters. Shutters are expensive, and I
    don’t think you will need them.

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  12. you can also work with back bay shutters — i think they’re in waltham. there are lots of historic precedents for ways to make the shutters pocket back into the casing so that they “disapear” when you don’t want them in use. Also, as someone above said, you can have them cut like dutch doors; there are lots of precedents for this in beacon hill…. another interesting thing are shutter rod hardware for a hinged or pivotting cafe curtain — get the softness of a curtain with the operability and structure of a shutter. I’ve used Campbell Iron Works on a project see web site. there are others…
    http://www.campbellironworks.com/curtain_rod_crane_swing_arm.html

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  13. Hi Katie,

    The shutters would be a great solution for your windows. We have raised panel shutters in the front windows of our Beacon Hill apartment. Our shutters are split half way up so we can leave the bottom closed for privacy and keep the upper half open for light. I love the look of the panel shutters closed up against the window casing – gives a beautiful extra detail!

    No matter what you choose, I’m sure it will be absolutely beautiful!!!

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  14. Hi Katy,

    I am fortunate to have lots of interior shutters in my 1827 house in Salem–raised panel shutters which we call “Indian Shutters”, a reference to the West Indies rather than Native Americans! When one was damaged I simply had a good finish carpenter reproduce it. I strongly recommend going with a local carpenter rather than an online company. They are not expensive to make and a local carpenter will be more sensitive to local style. Unfortunately there are lots of great carpenters who are underemployed right now!

    Donna

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  15. i could not agree more shutters rock! they serve a purpose with style! cafe shutters are the way to go. although that bathroom picture with the brass bathtub and full length shutters is amazing!

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  16. Love the shutter idea…simple and clean and lets the light in. I am really enjoying your blog after discovering it a couple months ago. I am getting ideas for my own home and love following your progress. I have also made the whoopie pies and the cinnamon raison bread with great success! Also, I am a fellow Elliott!

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